Classes start again 8th July

Classes start again 8th July 7pm-8.30pm

MMA at The FightLab Combat Arts in Huddersfield. Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground. MMA takes our JKD Concepts into the realms of full contact combat sports. The emphasis in this class is on training purely functional technique & contact sparring standing up & on the floor with PPE. We will pay particular attention to teaching you the fundamentals and making sure you improve in both skill and understanding of the sport at a comfortable pace. As you master your strikes, kicks and punches & grappling, we guarantee you'll be engaged and entertained with each new class.

Our key concepts at The FightLab's MMA training sessions are:

  1. Having no limitations
  2. Freedom of expression
  3. Simplicity & directness
  4. Economy of motion
  5. Non-Classical movement
  6. Non-telegraphic motion
  7. Understanding rhythm
  8. Interception
  9. The four ranges
  10. Five ways of attack
  11. Centreline theory
  12. Combat realism
  13. Conditioning

Here are just a few of the many benefits you can expect to see with our classes:

  • Fitness MMA works every muscle in the body, and you will burn fat and build solid muscle with each class.
  • Real world fighting skills Only the techniques that are proven to work at the highest level will survive. You don’t have to get into the cage or compete to learn the same techniques used by professional fighters!
  • Stress-busting Let’s face it- hitting stuff is fun and releases a ton of stress! Not only will you feel great, but your stamina will also go through the roof!
  • Join a team We have people who just want to learn to look after themselves and get fit and we have competitive fighters.
  • Improved flexibility and coordination When your flexibility and coordination improves, you will move with ease and grace. You will be less likely to get pains or injuries and you will coast through your day like a well-oiled machine.

Come along on our next training night and speak with our friendly staff and students.

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Sak Yant – Muay Thai tattoos

Tattoos have always been a part of south Asian culture for protection or to record memorable moments, pains, successes, and loved ones. In Thailand many Buddhist monks have employed the “Sak Yant” tattoo method for religious purposes. People have been passing on the traditional method of thai tattoos for years, and it remains a huge part of Muay Thai.
Sak Yant tattoos are created for many reasons, the primary ones being religious and protective.

Within Muay Thai, it is said that these tattoos give the one superhuman strength, the ability to become quicker, and to protect them from evil spirits.  There is much meaning behind these tattoos other than beautiful symmetry, and it’s important to recognise the significance of getting a sak yant in Thai culture.

The Ritual Behind Sak Yant

The meaning of Sak Yant is simple; “Sak” means tattoo and “Yant” means magical symbol. In order to receive the blessings that typically power the tattoos, you will have to receive it from an Ajarn, or teacher in the art.


The Ajarn will determine what design needs to be placed on your skin, and he will also determine where on your body it should be placed. There are exceptions to this case, but traditional Sak Yant gives these choices strictly to the person transferring magical power into a recipient’s body.
When beginning the tattoo, an Ajarn will read your soul, determining what should be put onto your skin next. Sometimes he will ask questions, and sometimes this process could take up to an hour of observation before an Ajarn will figure out the best Sak Yant for you. It is believed that the soul resides within the head, and tattoos will have more power the closer they are to the crown of your head.
Everyone knows that tattoos can be painful, and the traditional Thai method is no exception. The Ajarn will take a large bamboo or metal rod, dip it into ink, and begin taking quick, calculated stabs to the recipient’s skin.


There are additional ingredients that have being known to be put into the ink in order for it to have its magical properties. Studies show that different recipes hold different ingredients, and can range from charcoal, herbs, and even snake venom.

After the design is finished, the ajarn performs a chanted sutra then blows the prayer into the skin to activate the tattoo’s powers. This is said to create a powerful force, bringing down the energy of the ajarn, his teachers, and the teachings of Buddha into the body.

“The sak yant tradition is not simply animism and Buddhism practiced side by side, but rather an integrated system of magic in which neither can exist without the other.” – Joe Cummings, author of Sacred Tattoos of Thailand

It can be considered insulting to get a fake Sak Yant by a novice, or normal tattoo artist. The ink and the person doing the tattoo will not be able to bless your Sak Yant and it will be powerless. Misrepresentation of these symbols has landed some people in jail, leading the Thai cultural minister to threaten banning tourists from getting religious tattoos altogether.

There is also a series of rules that you must obey if you wish to keep the power of the tattoo inside your body. “the tradition is also deeply entwined in the Buddhist moral code that the designs can lose their powers if a wearer errs from their spiritual path.

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Anatomy Of The Punch

Kickboxing utilities all the major muscle groups. Along with its aerobic and anaerobic benefits, it makes a total full body workout.

Let’s look at the particular muscle groups used.

The Jab

The left jab begins with elevation of left scapula and involves upper traps 1 & 2, levator scapulae, and rhomboid muscles. Flexion takes place using mainly the pectoralis major as well as medial rotation using mainly the pectoralis minor, anterior deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscles. The elbow joint is extended using the triceps brachii mainly. The arm is pronated at the radioulnar joint using the pronator muscles. The right internal oblique and left external oblique also come into play when torso rotates and laterally flexes to the right as a result of the throwing punch with force.

The lead foot in most cases should step forward as the jab is being thrown with the rear foot providing a ‘push’. Immediately after the jab is thrown, slide the rear foot forward to close distance if needed

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The Cross

The right cross punch begins with elevation of the shoulder involving upper traps. The levator scapulae mainly. The same exact same movements occur simultaneously except using the right side of the body. However, the incorporation of the lower body makes this phase the ‘power’ phase.

The movements of the lower body are synchronised with those of the upper body simultaneously in creating a very forceful punch.

Starting with the right hip joint, medial rotation takes place using mainly the anterior portion of gluteus minimus and tensor muscle. The knee joint then flexes. The right ankle joint then is in flexion.

All of the upper and lower body movements occur simultaneously and is a whole movement that takes a lot of practice to get perfect.
The Hook

Throwing the left hook begins with elevation of left scapula in the shoulder. There is very slight protaction of left scapula. Next, there is abduction at GH joint bringing elbow and arm up high by eye level.

Elbow is in flexed position and really doesn’t extend. Horizontal adduction at left GH joint using pectoral muscles and  deltoids is what mainly puts arm through striking motion with elbow joint locked in flexion.

All these movements occur within quick succession of one another. The right internal oblique and left external oblique are used in rotation of torso to the right. The lower body is also incorporated into this phase to make it more forceful. The left hip joint is medially rotated using the anterior portion of gluteus minimus. The knee remains in a flexed position. At the ankle joint there is plantar flexion using mainly gastrocs and soleus.

Of course this is a pretty detailed breakdown. Even pro boxers spend much time practicing, perfecting and honing there skills. Timing and coordination and defence is key when executing any strike.

Contact us

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Muay Thai Clinch

The Muay Thai clinch is by far the hardest aspect of Muay Thai to learn. It is this form of grappling that sets Muay Thai apart from Kickboxing and K1 rules where clinching is only allowed momentarily..
Getting in a clinch with a very high level Muay Thai fighter, you will understand what it means to be completely dominated.

Arm Control

In clinch there are good positions, neutral positions and bad positions. If your opponent has two hands around your neck and has your head pulled down, that is obviously a bad position for you and a good position for your opponent. Most of the time when you clinch you will find yourself in a neutral position with one hand gripping your opponent’s neck and the other hand controlling their arm. The aim is to get the inside clinch. This enables you to have control over the neck and therefore the balance. In every clinching position you will find yourself battling for arm position and control. Good arm control gives you balance, and allows you to prevent your opponent’s arms, and can give you opportunities to sweep.

The key to clinching is trying to put yourself in a strong position so you can control your opponent. If you have a good grip on your opponent, you can off balance them when they try to sweep you, shift them when they try to knee you and put yourself in a good position to attack.

Balance and Body Position

Another important factor inside of the clinch is your balance and body positioning. Balance is the key to learning how to stay up on your feet.

One of the keys to staying balanced in the clinch is your body position. Keeping your hips square to your opponent’s hips will allow you to adjust your feet and shift your weight to prevent your opponent from sweeping you. Keeping you hip close to your opponent will minimise the possibility of taking a knee.

Knees Inside the Clinch

Knees are going to determine whether you are winning or losing inside of the clinch. Different knee strikes score different amount of points. If you throw side knees on your opponent, that will score less than an unblocked knee strike straight through the middle of your opponent’s abdomen.

You can either throw a knee when you are locked in the clinch or you can pull your opponent and throw a knee when they are off balanced. Your ability to throw good knee strikes at your opponent will be determined by your arm and body position.

Sweeps and Off Balancing Techniques

As a general rule of thumb, if you can sweep your opponent in the clinch then do it. Sweeps score the most points if you can get a clean throw without ending up on the ground yourself. A good sweep showcases dominance over your opponent inside of the clinch, something that judges are looking for.

Learning how to sweep your opponent is easy in practice, but harder in reality. When you are drilling with a partner it is easy to execute a sweep, however, when you have someone resisting and trying to stay on their feet it is a much bigger challenge.

While knowing how to perform a sweep is important, the key to sweeps is all about timing. Waiting for that right moment when your opponent is slightly off balanced and executing a sweep is a sure way to send them to the ground.

The key to a good sweep is to keep your hips close to your opponent and twist with your hips as you pull with your arm.

Sweeps are difficult to pull off, but are very rewarding if you can land them. There is nothing more satisfying than sending an opponent flying to the ground. It looks good to the judges, the crowds, and it feels even better.

Clinch Entry and Exit

The last important point I want to talk about is the entry into and out of the clinch.
If you want to enter the clinch, you need to get past your opponent’s kicks, punches and elbows to get inside the clinch. While skilled clinchers are very good at getting into the clinch, this is a skill in itself that takes practice to develop.
If you ever fight a good opponent they won’t let you simply walk into the clinch. You will need to cut off their angle and try and force yourself into the clinch. Often that means absorbing damage as you come forward. One of the reasons why some people have a hard time entering the clinch in a fight is because they never work on it in sparring.

Common Clinching Mistakes

Not Being Square to Your Opponent
If you don’t keep your hips and feet squared to your opponent, you can be thrown off balanced easily. This is why you need to create good habits from the start.

Trying to Knee When You Are Off Balanced

The best way to get swept in the clinch is to knee when you are not in a good balanced position. If you don’t have an establish arm position and you are not balanced, do not throw a knee. Only throw knees when you are locked in a good position or after you have thrown your opponent off balance.

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Coffee Before A Workout?

Improved circulation

In a study, each participant drank a measured cup of either regular or decaffeinated coffee. Afterward, there finger blood flow was measured to find out how well the body’s smaller blood vessels work.

Those who drank caffeinated coffee experienced a 30% increase in blood flow over a 75-minute period, compared to those who drank decaf. As your muscles need oxygen, better circulation equals a better workout.

Less pain

Consuming the caffeine equivalent of two to three cups of coffee one hour before a 30-minute high-intensity exercise reduces  muscle pain. Caffeine helps you push harder during strength-training workouts, improving muscle strength and endurance.

Better memory

In tests researchers gave people who did not regularly consume caffeine either a placebo, or 200 mg of caffeine five minutes after studying a series of images. The next day, both groups were asked to remember the images, and the caffeinated group scored significantly better. A brain boost is a real benefit during workouts, especially when they entail needing to recallspecific routines and combinations.

Muscle preservation

Caffeine is found to help offset the loss ofmuscle strength that occurs with aging.  The results indicate that in moderation, caffeine may help preserve overall fitness and reduce the risk of age-related injuries.

More muscle fuel

A little caffeine post-exercise may also be beneficial, particularly for endurance athletes who perform day after day. The research found that compared to consuming carbohydrates alone, a caffeine/carb combo resulted in a 66% increase in muscle glycogen four hours after intense, glycogen-depleting exercise. Glycogen, the form of carbohydrate that gets stockpiled in muscle, serves as a vital energy during exercise, to power strength moves, and fuel endurance.

    • The maximum amount of caffeine recommended for enhancing performance with minimal side effects is about 16 ounces of coffee.
    • Doctor up coffee with almond milk and cinnamon instead of cream and sugar, or whip coffee or tea into a fruit smoothie, along with other nutrient-rich ingredients like almond butter and oats or quinoa.
    • Research shows that when your caffeine intake is steady, your body adjusts, which counters dehydration, even though caffeine is a natural diuretic.
    • Keep drinking water.