Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Kickboxing your way to weight-loss

One of the things you often hear is that 95% of weight loss attempts fail long-term. Discouraging number? But still, it leaves us with the idea that only 5% of fat people are able to leave their weight behind and get to a healthy body size. When weight loss failure numbers are presented (generally 80-95% failure) “success” doesn’t mean achieving “normal weight” – permanently. If the average company had a 95% failure rate on there product, they would go out of business. However in the diet industry, failure means success, as people will return to there front door looking for a quick fix to there weightloss issues.

The healthiest, most long lasting way to weighloss is through a combination of exercise and diet.

Weight loss is simple. In theory. If the energy you intake (food) each day adds up to less than the energy output (exercise, digesting food, tapping your fingers etc) then you will lose weight. 


Despite Kickboxings fearsome reputation in the world of martial arts, when it comes to entry level participating it is actually a buzzing community full of people of all ages, background and ability. It is a myth that the only people who practice Muay Thai boxing are fighters. The vast majority learn for fitness, weight control and self-protection purposes. The training is intense but it is worth the physical investment. Every session you will build on what you have learned previously. Even if you were to change nothing else about your life, just by taking up Muay Thai you will automatically increase energy output creating an energy deficit meaning weight loss will occur (unless you are putting away some serious calories every day). Combined with sensible eating, adding Muay Thai into the mix can lead to significant changes in body composition.

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Bodyweight Exercises for Muay Thai 

Whether you’re an amateur or professional this bodyweight exercise session has being designed in accordance to the main muscle groups used by fighters.

1. Pull Ups/Chin Ups

Hitting several muscle groups including the shoulders, back, arms, deltoids and even abdominal muscles (when the knees are tucked up). Use different grips to engage different muscle groups.

Fighter Benefit: Controlling your opponent on the ground in the clinch or on the floor.

2. Hanging Leg Raises

This is for the abs and core . It is one of the best for full abdominal strength, while working your upper body.

Fighter Benefit: Developing abs strength is essential for both body amour and as a power source for attacks.

3. Push Ups and Handstand Push Up

This strength and muscle mass exercise is another staple bodyweight exercise that forces you to engage your entire body. With different push up variations you can develop power. Handstand pushups, especially when you do them through a more complete range of motion, can build serious arm and shoulder strength.

Fighter Benefit: Improved shoulder endurance for punches, kicks, takedowns, muscular endurance for grappling and creating space between you and your opponent.

4. Bodyweight Squats

The bodyweight squat if a valuable exercise to help build lower body strength, power and muscle. The regular movement may not be the greatest for strength and muscle mass, but when you use variations like the pistol squat or jump squats, now you are talking strength, power and conditioning.

Fighter Benefit: This movement will help you develop strength needed for takedown and takedown defense along with striking and kicking stability.

5. Bulgarian Split Squat

A lower body unilateral compound move performed with added resistance from dumbbells. Trains the glutes and legs of one leg at a time. This bilateral movement has more potential for strength gains, as you are more balanced and can bring both legs to bear on moving the weight. The Bulgarian Split Squat can help even out strength differences between the legs. You can only use one leg, while the other helps provide stability or balance.

Fighter Benefits: This exercise works you quadriceps, glutes and solueus muscles are important in throwing kicks, striking, takedown and takedown defense.

6. Parallel Dips

This strength exercise works the triceps, chest, upper back and shoulder stability strength.

7. Bear Crawls
These are great for joint mobility and full body strength. These movements are great for upper body strength, core, legs and cardio.

Fighter Benefit: Great for grapplers, endurance, mobility, agility and overall strength for all movement in kickboxing.

8. Abs Hip Thrusts/Bridge Variations

This is a great hip flexion and extension movement that works your core, hips, glutes and hamstrings. You can perform this on your back, thrusting your legs to the air, or you can use a bench and perform more of a Glute bridge.

Fighter Benefit: This is a classic movement in MMA, BJJ and wrestling when you are trying to push your opponent off from the mounted position.

9. Sprint Intervals

Sprints are must for grapple arts and other combat sport athletes. This helps to build both your anaerobic and aerobic systems, which you use in most fights. Because of the varying levels of high intensity followed by low intensity situations you must improve your anaerobic system to last through the fight. The aerobic system helps with recovery in between rounds.

Fighter Skill: This will improve your overall conditioning for endurance in competition and during training.

10. Sprawl Burpees

The burpee is the best full body exercise that works on your overall strength, explosiveness and cardio endurance. Sprawls are similar but more functional to combat sports where are again you are working the entire body and will improve your speed too. To me these exercises are the best for getting into shape for all combat athletes. Theses exercises train your body to move as one using over 600 muscles in one movement.

Fighter Benefit: Both exercises are beneficial for overall performance in competition.

Huddersfield, Ju-Jitsu, Jiu-Jitsu, Martial Arts, Kickboxing

Coffee Before A Workout?

Improved circulation

In a study, each participant drank a measured cup of either regular or decaffeinated coffee. Afterward, there finger blood flow was measured to find out how well the body’s smaller blood vessels work.

Those who drank caffeinated coffee experienced a 30% increase in blood flow over a 75-minute period, compared to those who drank decaf. As your muscles need oxygen, better circulation equals a better workout.

Less pain

Consuming the caffeine equivalent of two to three cups of coffee one hour before a 30-minute high-intensity exercise reduces  muscle pain. Caffeine helps you push harder during strength-training workouts, improving muscle strength and endurance.

Better memory

In tests researchers gave people who did not regularly consume caffeine either a placebo, or 200 mg of caffeine five minutes after studying a series of images. The next day, both groups were asked to remember the images, and the caffeinated group scored significantly better. A brain boost is a real benefit during workouts, especially when they entail needing to recallspecific routines and combinations.

Muscle preservation

Caffeine is found to help offset the loss ofmuscle strength that occurs with aging.  The results indicate that in moderation, caffeine may help preserve overall fitness and reduce the risk of age-related injuries.

More muscle fuel

A little caffeine post-exercise may also be beneficial, particularly for endurance athletes who perform day after day. The research found that compared to consuming carbohydrates alone, a caffeine/carb combo resulted in a 66% increase in muscle glycogen four hours after intense, glycogen-depleting exercise. Glycogen, the form of carbohydrate that gets stockpiled in muscle, serves as a vital energy during exercise, to power strength moves, and fuel endurance.

    • The maximum amount of caffeine recommended for enhancing performance with minimal side effects is about 16 ounces of coffee.
    • Doctor up coffee with almond milk and cinnamon instead of cream and sugar, or whip coffee or tea into a fruit smoothie, along with other nutrient-rich ingredients like almond butter and oats or quinoa.
    • Research shows that when your caffeine intake is steady, your body adjusts, which counters dehydration, even though caffeine is a natural diuretic.
    • Keep drinking water.